Things you thought you’d never do.

We’d come from Mirissa; endless beach parties of backpackers too young to drink in their own countries. The sound of the bass pounded through the wooden walls of our guesthouse until well past 3am. Maybe if the music had been better I would’ve wanted to dance, but a mixture of intense strobe lights and pounding techno turned me off the party scene of Sri Lanka’s beaches. Guess I’m getting old. When Hannah and I arrived through the pouring rain, early on Christmas morning, sleepy Midigama was waiting for us with her calming, open arms. We checked into a family-run guesthouse, a German couple on a surf holiday and a French girl on a long-term stay our only companions. Christmas was a wash of torrential rain. Taking turns riding on the back of Steve’s motorbike to the corner rotti shop, the only place we were brave enough to venture for food. And a carefree run through the farm fields of Midigama back to the guesthouse because no umbrella would’ve saved us anyway. When the sun came up the next morning, we lay still in our shared mosquito net, listening. There was no continued pound of the promised rains outside. The sun was shining and we took to the beach. A sunburn, a sunset and a yoga session in a field of cows later, we were off to give the parties of Mirissa another shot. We were taking the bus, but as the tuk tuk started their bartering, we raised our eyebrows in consideration. 500. This was the standard price, we’d never paid less or more. Last night we got it for 300.  I looked at Hannah, intrigued at her sudden desire to barter, something she never did. I let her go. Fine, 400. She flicked her wrist rather casually as she walked away. A price we’d never even been offered, but she didn’t want it. We headed for the road to give it another shot. We both saw the bus at the same time as we ran across the single road that runs all the way from Galle to Matara. Buses, trucks, and tuk tuks serving between each other for the length of it. We both looked up at the same time to see if it was the bus we needed, we’d spent 30 rupees on that trip instead of 400. I saw it happening. I looked down a split second…

Read More